Saturday, January 5, 2013

goodbye happiness


Sometimes collecting records is like an archaelogical dig. You know you're going to find something, you just never know what it will be exactly.

I don't come across them often, but I usually grab these home-recorded discs when i see them. These records were made to be used with recording turntables that were around in the 40s until who-knows-when... They are interesting because they are a totally unique snapshot in audio form. One of a kind recordings that regular people made in their living rooms.

I don't know how common the recording machines used to make them were in average homes, but i do seem to recall an episode of the Honeymooners where Ralph makes a message recording of some important something-or-other for Ed. Of course, the records end up getting switched, and the hilarity ensued... If blue-collar schmucks like Ralph Cramden could afford one on a bus drivers salary in 1955, maybe they were pretty common. I've never seen one in person though- That i know of...

I only have a handful of these discs in my collection, most of them are just people speaking messages to other people. I have one sent from a WWII soldier to his sweetheart back home that'll bring a tear to your eye. Every time i listen to it i hope that that guy made it home safe and made lots of babies with the lady he sent that record to... Another one i have is an excerpt of Teddy Roosevelt's acceptance speech that someone apparently recorded off of the radio dated Nov 4th 1940, i have at least one drunk party message one, and so on... Aside from the really awful sounding church recordings, and noisy group renditions of lame Christmas songs in my meager collection, this is the one decent recording of a good song sung by a singer who can actually sing! This is why i grab these when i find them... You just never know...

I'm not familiar with it, so i consulted the google-nets to try to figure out who originally performed the song "Goodbye Happiness," because i wanted to give the record an approximate date. I'm guessing mid to late 1940s was when the blank disc was manufactured, but when it was recorded is still a mystery.  Without knowing when the song was popular it's tough to say when this recording was made. (Go ahead and google the song title yourself- you'll see what happens.)

If ANYONE has ANY information on the song, (Who sang it, when it was a hit, etc) PLEASE comment. I look forward to hearing from you...

The other side, simply labeled "Thunder & Rain" is just that. It's about a minute long.

Goodbye Happiness


Thunder & Rain


get it
.

.



3 comments:

Andy said...

What a cool post! Thanks for sharing it. Where did you find the record?

You'll find that the particular Roosevelt making an acceptance speech in 1940 would be Franklin Delano. Teddy died in 1919 (on this very day, coincidentally), and wasn't doing much public speaking by 1940.

Rockin' Jeff said...

Oop! Wrong Roosevelt! That record doesn't specify which Roosevelt it was...

I found this one recently at a flea market. The vendor didn't know or care what he had records-wise. I bought this and a handful of old kiddie 78s for three bucks.

Not a bad little ditty, eh? No luck on figuring out who or when the song is originally from though...

scott s. said...

likely early 1950s. acetate/home made recordings common from the mid-late 1940s into the mid-late 50s until reel to reel tape became commonplace in the home. A lot of home recordings were audio of what you would record today on your cell phone.

It's interest you find an acetate with a 45 hold, which dates it post mid 1949 when RCA introduced the format and the first 45 players as a rival to the columbia 33 1/3 RPM LP, which was related to the 16 inch radio transcription, THE recording format for radio from the late 20s until the late 50s. tape pretty much eliminated disc recordings until the CD in the 80s.

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